Physical And Mental Health | The Relationship

Physical And Mental Health | The Relationship

Ayla is 22-years-old and is in her final year, studying Screenwriting & Film Studies. Ayla got involved with Student Life to create a dialogue for mental health issues. 

The philosopher, Renée Descartes, believed that the mind and body were separate. Of course, this is still what most people think. Whilst the mind controls thought, the body controls movement. However, as research into mental health issues has advanced it is clear that the body and mind can influence one another. As such, our physical state can affect out mental state, and vice versa. And, if so, what can we do to make sure we are looking after ourselves, especially at university?

According to the Mental Health Foundation, there are many factors which can hugely impact the way we think and feel. The first is diet and exercise. Others include lifestyle choices, such as smoking or alcohol intake, but also our general health. 

Indeed, it is generally the somewhat abhorrent presumption that university students go out partying every night, drink alcohol almost every day, and eat takeaway food most of the time. What’s more, we have all heard of (or even suffered from) the dreaded freshers’ flu! Coming to university itself can be a massive shock to your mental health, and immune system. With workloads, deadlines, and outside commitments, it can feel like your life is going at one thousand miles per hour! So, here are just a few tips to keep your mind and body in balance.

Eat healthily 

Sometimes it can be too tempting to eat pizza every night. However, lots of carbohydrates and starchy foods can make you feel sluggish and tired. Try to incorporate healthier options into your diet, such as fish, fruit, and vegetables.

Get enough sleep 

It can be hard to sleep in halls with so many things going on around you. Try to make a regular sleep schedule and do something relaxing before bed, such as reading. Going on your phone will only wake you up! 

De-stress 

Carrying the weight of stress can be a horrible feeling. Stress can do many things to your physical health, such as raising your blood pressure and heart rate. It is important to talk about the things you’re stressed about (whether this be university work or your personal life). Talk to someone you trust, such as a lecturer, counsellor, or loved one.

Physical & Mental Health

Physical & Mental Health

Body Shaming | The Backlash

Body Shaming | The Backlash