My Relationship With Make-Up

My Relationship With Make-Up

Make-up is a massive part of society. You can’t open a magazine or browse Instagram without seeing an advert for make-up or someone showcasing their new products. 

There isn’t anything particularly wrong with make-up, it can make people happy and, in a way, it’s a form of art – allowing people to show their passion and skills. We see 

make-up in a different way and have a different relationship with make-up.

When I was younger, I wasn’t a massive fan of make-up. I didn’t really see the point, I found it a waste of money and time. Instead of getting up an hour early before school to just to do my hair and make-up, I’d much rather have a lie in. This was the case for most of my childhood and teenage life. Of course, I may have worn a little bit of lip-gloss that I got free with my favourite magazine or maybe I wore blue mascara for a week in Year 7 but then realised that it wasn’t very fashionable, but mostly I didn’t bother with it. Not because I felt I was above that and didn’t need to wear it, but just because I was happy without it. 

This quickly changed when I was about 15. Like most young people, I was influenced heavily by social media. It seemed to me, that if you wanted to be popular, if you wanted people to like you – you should care about your appearance and make an effort. Make-up suddenly became a big thing in my life. 

At first, I didn’t want to wear it just because others did, but I did nonetheless. And of course, at 15 I wasn’t particularly good. My foundation was too dark, my mascara too thick and I looked like a mess. I didn’t enjoy wearing make-up, it was more of a chore for me. It is right to say that like so many young people, I felt pressured to be in with the norm and do what everyone else was doing. 

Luckily, I soon realised that wearing make-up and having my hair a certain way didn’t matter. Of course, if I wanted to wear make-up I should, but not just because I felt that I was required to and not to excess if I did. For a few years, I stopped caring about what I looked like to others and just worried about the things that I felt were important. Like my friends, my family and exams. 

Since coming to university, I have got back into make-up and now I am enjoying wearing it and creating different styles. At one point in my life, I wore make-up because I thought it would change the way I looked and make me a better person. Now, I know that isn’t what make-up should be for. It’s something to enjoy, not something that you feel required to wear.

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