No One Took Him Seriously

No One Took Him Seriously

Jade is 17 years old. She takes maths and further maths at Felixstowe Academy. Jade got involved with Student Life as she enjoys writing and wants to get more involved in the community.

Why is it that men feel like they can’t open up about their feelings? Four months ago my brother, Aaron, hung himself. He didn’t feel like he could tell anyone about his emotions, or how low he was feeling. The one time he did tell someone, his GP, he got this response ‘I can’t section you because you’re not mad’. Of course, it isn’t the GP’s fault, but had he taken my brother as seriously as he maybe would have taken a female, Aaron would still be alive.

All his life, Aaron suffered with bipolar disorder, borderline personality disorder, and schizophrenia. He couldn’t tell his friends about this, because they would just make jokes about it, and he couldn’t talk to me or my mum because his schizophrenia manifested itself as us saying horrible things to him. As a consequence, his mental health deteriorated, to the point where, instead of helping him, he was kicked out of high school.

From here it was a downward spiral, Aaron moved to Manchester and tried to kill himself twice by overdosing, both times he was sectioned for a few months and then just left to live by himself again. His friends didn’t take him seriously when he tried to seek help from them, they viewed him as weak, and the mental health services didn’t see him as ‘at risk’. He began to drink significant amounts along with sniffing cocaine and smoking weed. Eventually, he was evicted and had to come back to Felixstowe to live with me and my mum.

Still, no one took him seriously, they all turned a blind eye, until he hung himself. Then they all asked ‘Why didn’t he seek help?’. The answer is he did, but they didn’t listen.

RIP Aaron Hallam 1994-2018

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