Can You Have Peace Without A War?

Can You Have Peace Without A War?

As winter approaches, everyone is covertly seeking a source of warmth and wants Jack Frost to get lost. Whether that’s attained from your regular gingerbread latte or radiates from those you love, we can all identify with the need for comfort and trust within our lives, particularly as the festive season approaches!

Out of the blue my young cousin recited a particular phrase to me the other day which I think should be perpetuated more within our generation: ‘I’m a lover, not a fighter’. She may be unaware of its significance, though I think it reflects a lot regarding what we take for granted in modern times.

The idea of love over conflict is a present and prominent message, but a familiar one. Its abundance within books, film and other easily accessible media can distance it from us, masking its relevance to our society by transforming it into a cliche, more of an idealistic, unattainable goal than a possibility. 

The reality is, we still have to fight to achieve what should be a right rather than a privilege. The term ‘fighting’ can be ambiguous: it can refer to campaigning, to activism, which is important to engage in. Fighting for equality, for peace, for freedom, for what we believe is right and justified, is something relevant to all societies and cultures, as we still haven’t yet achieved a world in which love dominates conflict completely. But each day we are getting there, and each individual act effects change.

My overall point is, the importance of love and peace is so familiarised to us that we become desensitised to it, and its significance becomes lost. Though society is more accommodating and accepting now than ever, conflict and struggle still manifest themselves in various ways, so in order for love, cooperation and unity to prosper, we should engage in forwarding change when and where we can. We should fight for it!

Relationships can be worth as much as the conflict we endure to maintain them or more; they are worth fighting for. Conflict to me is necessary to appreciate peace, rather than to merely achieve it. I think you can be both a lover and a fighter; context is all.

Relationships...

Relationships...

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