Netflix Review - Black Mirror

Netflix Review - Black Mirror

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Black mirror: Bandersnatch, debuted December 28th, 2018, is the first interactive film tailored for adult viewing, containing the occasional scene of violence, gore and adult humour, nothing short of the expected. 

At the start, the viewer is introduced to Stefan Butler. Stefan is influenced by the viewer’s decisions throughout. At points during the film, the viewer is presented with two options at the bottom of the screen, and a time bar indicating the allotted time left to make a choice, this usually happens when Stefan encounters a pivotal decision during the film.

Each decision selected by the user, results in different outcomes which could possibly unlock new endings. In total there are 5 main possible endings, however this adventure consists of many more unsuccessful endings, so choose wisely…

In the beginning, Stefan is portrayed as an aspiring computer game developer, in the film setting of 1980s South London, who reaches out to a professional gaming development company, Tuckersoft. Hoping to extend his success with computer games, Stefan pitches his resurgence of Bandersnatch, inspired by the choose-your-destiny book. The book is said to follow several, complex paths, however results in fixed endings, as if fate is set, or controlled for you…

An interesting underlying motif throughout the film, is the sense of freewill, or rather lack thereof. Brooker cleverly implements Stefan’s realization of reduced freewill as the film progresses. It becomes clear to the viewer that Stefan’s increasing awareness accelerates later into the film, this creates a faster, more captivating storyline towards the end, keeping the viewer engaged up until the final moments.

The media streaming giant, Netflix, have renewed their support for the platform’s exclusive series, and I’m glad they have. Bandersnatch provides an intriguing and engaging experience for the viewer as they watch how their optionally irresponsible choices can unfold resulting in irreversible consequences. On the other hand, repeating the film to experience different endings, can become tedious after re-watching a sequence of scenes several times. However, unique ideas and themes, definitely out weigh the negatives.

I would highly recommend this film as an innovative and unequalled viewing experience, but after all it is your choice…

“Harry is a 16-year-old Sixth Form student and has decided to get involved with Student Life because he believes it is a great experience to allow someone to broadcast their thoughts and opinions to a wider audience”

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